Boy and Goldfish

PhotographerC. F. Clarke

CountryUnited States

MediumPlatinum

Year1908

View Additional Information & Tags

Children, Pets, Portrait: Children, Postal Photographic-Print Exchange Clubs

Dimensions

Image Dimensions: 23.0 cm x 18.4 cm
Support Dimensions: 35.5 cm x 28.0 cm


Charles F. Clarke, a business agent with the Forbes Lithograph Company, was from Springfield, MA and a member of the American Photographic Salon.

     “In the death of C. F. Clarke, which occurred November 1, 1912, at Springfield, Mass., photography has lost a notable and devoted pictorialist, one whose work has been seen for many years at the principal exhibitions of America and Europe, including the London Salon, and the American Photographic Salon. Pictures representing his eminent pictorial talent have appeared in the principal photographic magazines; and Photo-Era, in particular, has published many of his finest pictorial achievements, including ” The Winding Brook,” ” Dreary Road,” ” Boy and Goldfish,” ” In the Orchard,” and “Sunlight and Shadow,-’ the last-named picture being hung in the London Salon of 1912.”

It was Mr. C. F. Clarke, who, in 1907, permanently won the famous Photo-era sterling silver Loving-Cup, a trophy for which the photo-pictorialists of North America hotly contested. In spite of a long and serious physical disability, which would have discouraged most men, and which he bore in a remarkable fortitude, Mr. Clarke attended to his business as agent of the Forbes Lithograph Company, and devoted his leisure time to the hobby in which he achieved such marked success. He had contributed, shortly before his death, several pictures to the Ninth American Salon.

Mr. Clarke was a member of several prominent camera clubs in America and Europe, all of which passed resolutions of appreciation of his bravery through many years of impaired health, of the good cheer and optimism which he always radiated, of his uncommon skill as a camera-worker, and his genial disposition and sterling character as a man.

We hereby acknowledge the receipt of many letters, showing the appreciation and esteem in which Mr. Clarke was held by camera clubs and individual workers, far and wide.” 1.

 

1. Obituary notice: The Photo Era: 1913: p. 51

Boy and Goldfish